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You could use this process for any subject. Obviously, Maths is a key area for quizzes. I have included some Maths questions below as well as some non-Maths ones to give you some idea of how I use ‘The Quiz.’ You, too, can build up your own bank of questions to use.

Remember, they need to include questions from the simple to the complex or more difficult. For difficult questions, I will often give clues and/or more points for a correct answer. The mental arithmetic approach taken in the quiz is designed to encourage students to become powerful listeners and to give them experience in problem solving/critical thinking in a fun, non-threatening environment.

The Procedure:

  1. The quiz can be a competition between boys and girls.
  2. Points are given for correct answers and totalled for boys and girls after each question.
  3. Points can be doubled or tripled for more difficult questions.
  4. Students who are caught cheating have double points deducted from their team score.
  5. Anyone with a pencil in hand when the answer is given is declared wrong. This is to prevent students writing in the answer and claiming a right answer. No ticks are required for correct answers or crosses for an incorrect one.
  6. Use the mental arithmetic procedure to create a discipline environment and to encourage students to develop their listening and watching skills. (See below for the mental arithmetic procedure).
  7. For a critical thinking/problem solving quiz, give the answer after each question and explain how you arrived at the answer.
  8. Try to make these sorts of questions fun as well as challenging. Questions with a twist and which require concentrated listening work best. The questions don’t need ‘difficult’ thinking all the time but rather require different thinking.
  9. Below are two fun Maths questions to give you an idea of what I mean.

A. One day I saw a horse standing on three legs so I weighed him. I found he weighed 300 kilograms. The next day he was standing on four legs so again I put him on the scales. What do you think he weighed on four legs? (Most answer 400 kg. The answer is 300 kg.)

B. How many months of the year have 30 days? (Most say 4. The answer is 11 as February is the only month that doesn’t have 30 days.)

  1. Here are two non-Maths questions.

If you spelt out the numbers (one by one from 1) how far would you have to go before you found the letter “A”? (Answer: 1000)
You have one match. รับทำ seo You enter a room that contains a wood-burning stove, a kerosene lamp, and a fireplace. Which do you light first? (Answer: The match).
The Mental Arithmetic Procedure:

There are the rules that students are given when doing the mental arithmetic quiz.

Firstly, the students:

Write the numbers 1 -10 vertically, one under the other, on your pads. (10 can be any number you have time for);
Put your pencils on your pad; and
Find something to put over your answers to hide them from roaming eyes.
Before the questions are given, students are given these instructions:

Arms are folded – questions are given.
When the student knows the answer, he/she puts his/her hands on his/her head.
When enough students have the answer, the teacher calls, “Answers down.”
When the answers are written, teacher calls, “Pencils down.” The student then covers the answer, puts pencil down and again folds arms.
The answer is given and the score for each team is noted on the board.
When all the questions are completed, the answers are corrected and results totalled; the teacher multiplies the boys’ score by the number of girls to get the boys’ final total and does the reverse to get the girls’ final score. Then the winning team is announced.
Please Note:

The ‘arms folded, hands on head’, is designed to develop self-discipline as well as mental discipline. (It prevents the students picking up their pencils to work it out).
The time you give students for each question depends on the difficulty as well as the students’ ability.
Wherever possible, teach students shortcuts and/or ways to check/estimate answers.
Teach your students listening skills, e.g. look directly at the teacher, watching their face/mouth and body language.
Don’t repeat questions more than twice unless a mistake has been made.
I have found that students in primary school and lower secondary school classes love the competitive nature of The Quiz as well as the different types of questions from the normal ones they are given. You can add a further dimension to the quiz by challenging the students to aim at getting 100% correct. When you do this, begin with easy questions first and gradually increase the difficulty as you go. This will keep more students involved in this challenge. After each question, ask who still has 100% correct and continue to challenge those with one wrong to aim to get no more wrong.

I have used a short quiz to start the lesson or one to finish the lesson when I have time left. How long or short the quiz is depends on the time you have available or the purpose of the quiz. My advice is to have it at random times and as a reward for the class.

Our author, Rick Boyce, has, over 45 years, used The Quiz extensively as a learning tool. He was fortunate that during his early career, he taught a variety of subjects in junior high classes where he learnt to use The Quiz extensively.

In recent years, as a relief teacher, he found that primary school students love “The Quiz” used in a ‘competitive situation’, e.g. a girls v boys quiz. It has helped him develop a rapport with his classes. For more on “The Quiz”, email rickboyce@bigpond.com. It offers examples of the types of quizzes that our author used during his career.

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